Good Food Fund

The Good Food Fund

We live in one of the world’s wealthiest countries, but have an increasing amount of food poverty within our society. People living in food poverty need political and economical changes as well as hands-on material help. We want to raise awareness of food poverty while using our power as a retailer to support organisations that provide this kind of help.

We ask our customers for cash donations with which we buy fruit and veg at cost price and pass it on to our partner organisations who run emergency food provision and community meals. Unlike supermarkets, we don’t make a profit on customer donations. Our partners are organisations that focus on poverty and disadvantage, work with dignity and try to provide a perspective beyond emergency food provision.

Donate:

To make a donation, you can:

  • put some coins into the green tin at the till in our shop
  • donate via your veg box subscription: email subscribers@glasgowlocavore.org to let us know how much you’d like to donate per week. This amount will be taken along with your veg box payment by direct debit. For a one-off donation, you can also donate through the Open Food Network.
  • make a one-off bank transfer or set up a standing order:
    Account Name: Good Food Fund
    Sort code: 80-22-60
    Account number: 12354669
  • set up a dedicated direct debit on our website: www.glasgowlocavore.org/pay – email subscribers@glasgowlocavore.org to let us know if you’d like to make weekly or monthly payments.
  • send us a cheque made payable to “Good Food Fund”

Our Partners:

Focus on poverty and disadvantage – Our most recent main partners focus their work on supporting people who struggle to find individual ways out of poverty, because they are in situations of societal stigmatisation.

Dignity – Emergency food providers who do not ask for a referral and do not limit the amount times a person can attend.

Perspectives beyond emergency food provision – Organisations that offer more than emergency food, for example training and volunteering opportunities.

South East Food Bank – One of the biggest local food-banks and our longest standing partner. Through your donations, this emergency food provider is able to give fresh, organic produce to the people who attend the service.

The Space (Govanhill) – They work with members of the Roma community. At the beginning of the partnership this project was about food distribution. The work of The Space has since shifted towards a more educational approach. Lately they have been using our donations for cookery classes.

The Marie Trust – They work with people who have a background of homelessness, mental health problems, addiction, people being released from prison, including people who are on the sex offenders’ register. They run daily meals at their centre in town. Preparing this meal also provides skills development and volunteering opportunities for people who come to their services. The Marie Trust actively looks for further opportunities for their volunteers.

The Night Shelter – They provide a safe place to stay and a daily hot meal for destitute asylum seekers, who cannot access homelessness services due to their immigration status. Your donations to the Night Shelter give support to a group of people who have fallen through all networks of state support.

Queens Park Govanhill Parish Church –  They run a food bank and a meal for people with homelessness and addiction backgrounds. Their foodbank does not require a referral and they do not limit the amount of times people can use the service. We encouraged the church to give out fruit at the meal and the food-bank, which was previously limited to dried/ canned foods.

Fruit credit – We ran a donation campaign to raise credit for the three newer partners last Christmas. The campaign raised around £700, which funded our supply to one of the partners for more than half a year.  The campaign was called ‘fruit credit’ because conversations with our partner organisations showed that the people they work with have in common a struggle to access fresh fruit. Emergency food providers generally find it hard to source fresh fruit and for people living in food poverty it is considered a luxury to buy. We used the campaign to raise awareness of this lack. Asking our partners what they need enabled a tiny amount of self-determination and choice. Choice over food, which most of us take for granted, is completely lacking in emergency food provision which relies on donations and surplus from supermarkets.